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1 Carol Sumner commented Permalink


Top 5 Reasons Not to Send That Calendar Invite

 
image

By Martin Keen, IBM Redbooks Project Leader



 



We all have the experience of using items in ways for which they were never intended. Sometimes this works great – a paper clip makes a perfect tool for pressing reset switches; a coin can make a handy screwdriver. Other times, it's a recipe for disaster – using my knees to control the steering wheel while unwrapping a drive-through burger. And then on occasion, things seem to be working just fine, but over time unfortunate unintended consequences begin to emerge.



 



I help run the IBM Redbooks social media presence (Facebook and Twitter). We recently adopted IBM Connections to manage tasks across our team. Before that, we managed our entire team through... calendar invitations. Along with the date and time of the next meeting, each calendar invitation contained meeting minutes, an agenda, and a spreadsheet attachment with important project details (monitoring schedule, IDs and passwords, and so forth).



 



Now yes, as a social media team, you'd think we'd know better. You'd think we'd recognize the perils of running a social business in a calendar application. But it was easy to adopt, and for a good while it mostly worked just fine. That was until some of those unintended consequences started to creep in.



 



Here are our Top 5 unintended consequences of running a social business with calendar invitations, and how an IBM Connections community saved us:



 




  • Who has that file?: Our trusty calendar invitation contained most of the information we'd need, but it was far from exhaustive. For example, we held a list of subject matter experts who could help get answers to questions from fans. The trouble was, that list was stored in a file on someone's computer. When I couldn't remember who the subject matter expert was for a question about the Emulex 10Gb Virtual Fabric Adapter (and it most certainly wasn't me!), I'd need to ask the person who held that list. With IBM Connections we store all common project information like this within a shared community.


  • Where did all the data go?: As the project information in the calendar invitation grew, we used the reschedule feature. Rescheduling a meeting invitation preserves all the existing information within it (creating a new meeting does not). One week, I declined the meeting invitation, and the invitation disappeared from my calendar completely! I had no access to all the important project information within it. With IBM Connections, I have access to our project information whenever I have access to a web browser.


  • Remind me of that URL again?: Social media is a growing domain, and soon a Facebook and Twitter presence were not enough. We added IBM Redbooks pages for LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube. And before long I'd forget where everything was. The Bookmarks feature of our IBM Connections community shares these URLs across the entire team.


  • Have you got the latest copy, or have I?: Putting project information in a spreadsheet attached to a meeting invitation seemed like a good idea at the time – until the spreadsheet needed updating. We included a list of “Question of the Week” ideas in this spreadsheet. If I wanted to suggest a new Question of the Week, I'd need to find out who had the latest copy of the spreadsheet, ask that person to add my idea, and then hope the person remembered to reattach the spreadsheet to the meeting invitation. Using the Activities feature in our IBM Connections community has revolutionized this process. Each member of the community can add new Question of the Week entries to the Activity, see what other members have contributed, and keep track of which ideas have already been posted.


  • How do we get our new team members up to speed?: Over time, new people joined the team. They'd typically have a lot of questions. Questions that had previously been asked and answered by existing team members. Those conversations typically took place over email, and it was never easy to dig out the answer to a question asked six months ago. “I've got the answer to that in my mail archive... somewhere.” With Forums in our IBM Connections community, new members have access to all previous discussions. A quick read gets them up to speed on all the issues we've already encountered, and provides a valuable skills transfer asset. No more digging in mail archives.


image Ultimately, we outgrew the calendar invitation approach. When we started out, this approach seemed fine - our team and scope were small. But we hadn't considered how the project would grow. Using IBM Connections from the start would have allowed us to accommodate this growth.



 



So that's our Top 5. I'm sure we're not the only ones finding unintended consequences in the way we use our calendar. What's your calendar story?

 
 
 
 
 
 

Martin Keen is an IBM Redbooks Project Leader in Raleigh, NC, USA. He has led the development of over 30 IBM Redbooks on topics including WebSphere, Business Process Management, and enterprise. Follow him on Twitter @MartinRTP.

 

Martin is an IBM Redbooks thought leader.


 
image



 



 

2 Holly Nielsen commented Permalink




Top 5 Reasons Not to Send That
Calendar Invite

 

href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/martinkeene.jpg"
target="_blank">imagesrc="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/martinkeene.jpg"
style="display:block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position:relative;" />


style="font-family:arial;">By Martin Keen, IBM Redbooks Project
Leader






 






We all have the experience of
using items in ways for which they were never intended. Sometimes
this works great – a paper clip makes a perfect tool for pressing
reset switches; a coin can make a handy screwdriver. Other times,
it's a recipe for disaster – using my knees to control the
steering wheel while unwrapping a drive-through burger. And then on
occasion, things seem to be working just fine, but over time
unfortunate unintended consequences begin to emerge.






 






I help run the IBM Redbooks
social media presence (href="http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooks">Facebook and href="https://twitter.com/#%21/IBMRedbooks">Twitter). We
recently adopted IBM Connections to manage tasks across our team.
Before that, we managed our entire team through... calendar
invitations. Along with the date and time of the next meeting, each
calendar invitation contained meeting minutes, an agenda, and a
spreadsheet attachment with important project details (monitoring
schedule, IDs and passwords, and so forth).






 






Now yes, as a social media team,
you'd think we'd know better. You'd think we'd recognize the perils
of running a social business in a calendar application. But it was
easy to adopt, and for a good while it mostly worked just fine.
That was until some of those unintended consequences started to
creep in.






 






Here are our Top 5
unintended consequences of running a social business with calendar
invitations, and how an IBM Connections community saved
us:






 








  • style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">


    Who has that
    file?
    : Our trusty
    calendar invitation contained most of the information we'd need,
    but it was far from exhaustive. For example, we held a list of
    subject matter experts who could help get answers to questions from
    fans. The trouble was, that list was stored in a file on someone's
    computer. When I couldn't remember who the subject matter expert
    was for a question about the Emulex 10Gb Virtual Fabric Adapter
    (and it most certainly wasn't me!), I'd need to ask the person who
    held that list. With IBM Connections we store all common project
    information like this within a shared community.




  • style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">


    Where did all the data
    go?
    : As the project
    information in the calendar invitation grew, we used the reschedule
    feature. Rescheduling a meeting invitation preserves all the
    existing information within it (creating a new meeting does not).
    One week, I declined the meeting invitation, and the invitation
    disappeared from my calendar completely! I had no access to all the
    important project information within it. With IBM Connections, I
    have access to our project information whenever I have access to a
    web browser.




  • style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">


    Remind me of that URL
    again?
    : Social media is
    a growing domain, and soon a Facebook and Twitter presence were not
    enough. We added IBM Redbooks pages for LinkedIn, Google+, and
    YouTube. And before long I'd forget where everything was. The
    Bookmarks feature of our IBM Connections community shares these
    URLs across the entire team.




  • style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">


    Have you got the latest copy,
    or have I?
    : Putting
    project information in a spreadsheet attached to a meeting
    invitation seemed like a good idea at the time – until the
    spreadsheet needed updating. We included a list of “Question of
    the Week” ideas in this spreadsheet. If I wanted to suggest a new
    Question of the Week, I'd need to find out who had the latest copy
    of the spreadsheet, ask that person to add my idea, and then hope
    the person remembered to reattach the spreadsheet to the meeting
    invitation. Using the Activities feature in our IBM Connections
    community has revolutionized this process. Each member of the
    community can add new Question of the Week entries to the Activity,
    see what other members have contributed, and keep track of which
    ideas have already been posted.




  • style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">


    How do we get our new team
    members up to speed?
    :
    Over time, new people joined the team. They'd typically have a lot
    of questions. Questions that had previously been asked and answered
    by existing team members. Those conversations typically took place
    over email, and it was never easy to dig out the answer to a
    question asked six months ago. “I've got the answer to that in my
    mail archive... somewhere.” With Forums in our IBM Connections
    community, new members have access to all previous discussions. A
    quick read gets them up to speed on all the issues we've already
    encountered, and provides a valuable skills transfer asset. No more
    digging in mail archives.







href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/calendarinvites.jpg"
target="_blank">imagesrc="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/calendarinvites.jpg"
style="display: block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position: relative;"
height="216" width="259" /> style="font-family:arial;">Ultimately, we outgrew the calendar
invitation approach. When we started out, this approach seemed fine
- our team and scope were small. But we hadn't considered how the
project would grow. Using IBM Connections from the start would have
allowed us to accommodate this growth.






 






So that's our Top 5. I'm
sure we're not the only ones finding unintended consequences in the
way we use our calendar. What's your calendar story?


 

 

 

 

 

 

style="font-family:arial;">Martin Keen style="font-family:arial;">is an IBM Redbooks Project Leader in
Raleigh, NC, USA. He has led the development of over 30 IBM
Redbooks on topics including WebSphere, Business Process
Management, and enterprise. Follow him on Twitter @
style="font-family:arial;">MartinRTP.


 

style="font-family:arial;">Martin is an IBM Redbooks thought
leader.




 

href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/rbtl.jpg"
target="_blank">imagesrc="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/rbtl.jpg"
style=" display:block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position:relative;" />






 






 


3 MARTIN KEEN commented Permalink


 
Top 5 Reasons Not to Send That
Calendar Invite

 

<a
href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/martinkeene.jpg"
target="_blank"><img alt="image"
src="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/martinkeene.jpg"
style="display:block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position:relative;" />
 
 

<span
style="font-family:arial;">By Martin Keen, IBM Redbooks Project
Leader

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
We all have the experience of
using items in ways for which they were never intended. Sometimes
this works great – a paper clip makes a perfect tool for pressing
reset switches; a coin can make a handy screwdriver. Other times,
it's a recipe for disaster – using my knees to control the
steering wheel while unwrapping a drive-through burger. And then on
occasion, things seem to be working just fine, but over time
unfortunate unintended consequences begin to emerge.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
I help run the IBM Redbooks
social media presence (<a
href="http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooks">Facebook and <a
href="https://twitter.com/#%21/IBMRedbooks">Twitter). We
recently adopted IBM Connections to manage tasks across our team.
Before that, we managed our entire team through... calendar
invitations. Along with the date and time of the next meeting, each
calendar invitation contained meeting minutes, an agenda, and a
spreadsheet attachment with important project details (monitoring
schedule, IDs and passwords, and so forth).

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
Now yes, as a social media team,
you'd think we'd know better. You'd think we'd recognize the perils
of running a social business in a calendar application. But it was
easy to adopt, and for a good while it mostly worked just fine.
That was until some of those unintended consequences started to
creep in.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
Here are our Top 5
unintended consequences of running a social business with calendar
invitations, and how an IBM Connections community saved
us:

 
 

 
 

 
 

  •  

  • <li
    style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">
     
     
    Who has that
    file?
    : Our trusty
    calendar invitation contained most of the information we'd need,
    but it was far from exhaustive. For example, we held a list of
    subject matter experts who could help get answers to questions from
    fans. The trouble was, that list was stored in a file on someone's
    computer. When I couldn't remember who the subject matter expert
    was for a question about the Emulex 10Gb Virtual Fabric Adapter
    (and it most certainly wasn't me!), I'd need to ask the person who
    held that list. With IBM Connections we store all common project
    information like this within a shared community.

  •  

  • <li
    style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">
     
     
    Where did all the data
    go?
    : As the project
    information in the calendar invitation grew, we used the reschedule
    feature. Rescheduling a meeting invitation preserves all the
    existing information within it (creating a new meeting does not).
    One week, I declined the meeting invitation, and the invitation
    disappeared from my calendar completely! I had no access to all the
    important project information within it. With IBM Connections, I
    have access to our project information whenever I have access to a
    web browser.

  •  

  • <li
    style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">
     
     
    Remind me of that URL
    again?
    : Social media is
    a growing domain, and soon a Facebook and Twitter presence were not
    enough. We added IBM Redbooks pages for LinkedIn, Google+, and
    YouTube. And before long I'd forget where everything was. The
    Bookmarks feature of our IBM Connections community shares these
    URLs across the entire team.

  •  

  • <li
    style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">
     
     
    Have you got the latest copy,
    or have I?
    : Putting
    project information in a spreadsheet attached to a meeting
    invitation seemed like a good idea at the time – until the
    spreadsheet needed updating. We included a list of “Question of
    the Week” ideas in this spreadsheet. If I wanted to suggest a new
    Question of the Week, I'd need to find out who had the latest copy
    of the spreadsheet, ask that person to add my idea, and then hope
    the person remembered to reattach the spreadsheet to the meeting
    invitation. Using the Activities feature in our IBM Connections
    community has revolutionized this process. Each member of the
    community can add new Question of the Week entries to the Activity,
    see what other members have contributed, and keep track of which
    ideas have already been posted.

  •  

  • <li
    style="margin-top:5.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;">
     
     
    How do we get our new team
    members up to speed?
    :
    Over time, new people joined the team. They'd typically have a lot
    of questions. Questions that had previously been asked and answered
    by existing team members. Those conversations typically took place
    over email, and it was never easy to dig out the answer to a
    question asked six months ago. “I've got the answer to that in my
    mail archive... somewhere.” With Forums in our IBM Connections
    community, new members have access to all previous discussions. A
    quick read gets them up to speed on all the issues we've already
    encountered, and provides a valuable skills transfer asset. No more
    digging in mail archives.

  •  

 
 

<a
href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/calendarinvites.jpg"
target="_blank"><img alt="image"
src="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/calendarinvites.jpg"
style="display: block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position: relative;"
height="216" width="259" /> <span
style="font-family:arial;">Ultimately, we outgrew the calendar
invitation approach. When we started out, this approach seemed fine
- our team and scope were small. But we hadn't considered how the
project would grow. Using IBM Connections from the start would have
allowed us to accommodate this growth.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
So that's our Top 5. I'm
sure we're not the only ones finding unintended consequences in the
way we use our calendar. What's your calendar story?


 

 

 

 

 

 

<span
style="font-family:arial;">Martin Keen
<span
style="font-family:arial;">is an IBM Redbooks Project Leader in
Raleigh, NC, USA. He has led the development of over 30 IBM
Redbooks on topics including WebSphere, Business Process
Management, and enterprise. Follow him on Twitter @
<span
style="font-family:arial;">MartinRTP.


 

<span
style="font-family:arial;">Martin is an IBM Redbooks thought
leader.

 
 

 

 
<a
href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/rbtl.jpg"
target="_blank"><img alt="image"
src="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/resource/BLOGS_UPLOADED_IMAGES/rbtl.jpg"
style=" display:block; margin: 1em 1em 0pt 0pt; float: left; position:relative;" />

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 


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