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1 Wannes Rams commented Permalink


Social software lessons from the field: Part 2

 
Paul Band, IBM Software Services for Collaboration
 
@therealpaulband.



 



In part 1 of this two-part series, we discussed some of the IBM Connections architectural options and how to get the most from profiles. Now we'll focus on some more tips that will help your IBM Connections deployment stand out from the crowd.



 



Community metrics



Measuring engagement and contribution will be an important part of your business adoption strategy. Community owners therefore need the ability to monitor the adoption of their communities. The Community Metrics component of IBM Connections allows community owners to see what’s the most valuable content, the most likable content and the most active content of the community, as well as the number of visits.



 



In order to expose and perform analysis on community metrics you must deploy the (optional) IBM Cognos Business Intelligence server component as part of the Connections infrastructure. Although this can be deployed at any time, building it into the overall deployment plan will make the roll out of Connections simpler and faster.



 



The Connections UI: Organizational branding



Many customers want to customize the Connections site to align with their corporate branding or intranet theme. Thankfully the Connections developers have made implementing changes to the user interface (UI) fairly straightforward. You will need some experience with web design (including CSS and JSP) and graphical design skills for manipulating images, such as logos.



 



From my experience you should engage your organization's graphics team to produce logos and other images, because they either have a library of images already or can create them very quickly. They can also advise on color scheme standards and provide color HEX values necessary for customizing the color scheme.



 



Common UI changes include:





  • Rebranding from IBM Connections to MyOrg Connect (or similar)





  • Updating the site's color scheme





  • Adding your corporate logos





  • Adding a custom disclaimer or usage policy on the login screen





  • Modifying existing URL links in the footer





 



The daily, weekly and update notifications are often overlooked and can also be customized to incorporate the same branding and UI scheme as in the main Connections site. One tip would be to test notifications in all the different email client types you have, as some things can render differently, depending on the implementation.



 



Performance tuning



If you followed the architectural advice thus far, the Connections system will be receptive to tuning to your specific usage and environment. Tuning and the resulting system capacity is affected by many factors including the type of usage and the hardware used (including servers, disk subsystems and network topology). You should aim to tune the system once it is fully in production and a typical type of usage is established.



 



There is a very good guide to IBM Connections performance tuning produced by the IBM Collaboration Solutions Performance Team that is available here. Although the guide was produced for version 4.0, many of the principles and techniques can be applied to future versions. It covers a number of deployment scenarios, so it should yield some useful insights regardless of your situation.



 



It's also worth pointing out that any performance tuning guide shouldn't be applied verbatim without first establishing a baseline performance that any subsequent tweaks can be measured against to determine the effect. Most tuning involves some form of trade-off. That is, you increase throughput or capacity of one subsystem at the cost of another. Having said that, I usually always apply the database tuning recommendations cited in the above guide.



 



Connections database scripts



On the subject of databases, IBM Connections ships with scripts used by the Create Database wizard to create all the necessary databases but with one-size-fits-all settings. These will work fine and get you started. However, it is likely that your backup and recovery strategy will be to perform online backups overnight without having to take the system down. To facilitate this, ask your DB2 database administrators to review the scripts prior to running them to ensure that Archive Transaction logging is enabled (this is a requirement of online backups in DB2). Also, maintenance tasks (such as performing a backup or a reorganization) and the requisite maintenance window will need to be defined at the database level.



 



Where a database administrator isn't available, or the scripts are run unmodified, I have written DB2 scripts to make the necessary modifications, although this does require the Connections environment to be down while the one-time maintenance is performed.



 



Your thoughts



I hope you find the experience documented in this two-part blog post useful. There will undoubtedly be more lessons learned along the way, and I look forward to hearing from you if you have any other tips you would like to share. Please leave your comments below or find me on Twitter @therealpaulband.



 



 



Paul Band is a technical consultant for IBM Software Services for Collaboration in the UK. Paul specializes in the implementation and administration of collaboration systems. Paul is especially passionate about using social networking to find expertise and widen his network. Paul co-authored a Redbooks wiki publication on Domino administration best practices and enjoys cycling and crazy golf.



 



Paul is an IBM Redbooks thought leader


 
 
 
 
 

2 Paul Band commented Permalink




style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">style="font-size: 13pt">Social software lessons from the field:
Part 2

 

Paul Band, IBM Software Services for
Collaboration
 

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/entry/social_software_lessons_from_the_field_part_1?lang=en_us"
target="_blank">part 1 of this two-part series, we
discussed some of the href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/conn/">IBM
Connections architectural options and how to get the most from
profiles. Now we'll focus on some more tips that will help your IBM
Connections deployment stand out from the crowd.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Community
metrics






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">style="font-weight: normal;">Measuring engagement and contribution
will be an important part of your business adoption strategy.
Community owners therefore need the ability to monitor the adoption
of their communities. The
Community Metrics component of IBM
Connections allows community owners to see what’s the most valuable
content, the most likable content and the most active content of
the community, as well as the number of visits.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In order to expose
and perform analysis on community metrics you must deploy the
(optional) href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">IBM
Coghref="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">nos
Business Intelligence server component as part of the
Connections infrastructure. Although this can be deployed at any
time, building it into the overall deployment plan will make the
roll out of Connections simpler and faster.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The Connections
UI: Organizational branding






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Many customers
want to customize the Connections site to align with their
corporate branding or intranet theme. Thankfully the Connections
developers have made implementing changes to the user interface
(UI) fairly straightforward. You will need some experience with web
design (including CSS and JSP) and graphical design skills for
manipulating images, such as logos.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">From my experience
you should engage your organization's graphics team to produce
logos and other images, because they either have a library of
images already or can create them very quickly. They can also
advise on color scheme standards and provide color HEX values
necessary for customizing the color scheme.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Common UI changes
include:













  • style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Rebranding from
    IBM Connections to MyOrg Connect style="font-style: normal;">(or similar)













  • style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Updating the
    site's color scheme













  • style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding your
    corporate logos













  • style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding a custom
    disclaimer or usage policy on the login screen













  • style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Modifying existing
    URL links in the footer













 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The daily, weekly
and update notifications are often overlooked and can also be
customized to incorporate the same branding and UI scheme as in the
main Connections site. One tip would be to test notifications in
all the different email client types you have, as some things can
render differently, depending on the
implementation.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Performance
tuning






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">style="font-weight: normal;">If you followed the architectural
advice thus far, the Connections system will be receptive to tuning
to your specific usage and environment.
Tuning and the
resulting system capacity is affected by many factors including the
type of usage and the hardware used (including servers, disk
subsystems and network topology). You should aim to tune the system
once it is fully in production and a typical type of usage is
established.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">There is a very
good guide to IBM Connections performance tuning produced by the
IBM Collaboration Solutions Performance Team that is available href="http://www-10.lotus.com/ldd/lcwiki.nsf/dx/IBM_Connections_4.0_Performance_Tuning_Guide">here.
Although the guide was produced for version 4.0, many of the
principles and techniques can be applied to future versions. It
covers a number of deployment scenarios, so it should yield some
useful insights regardless of your situation.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">It's also worth
pointing out that any performance tuning guide shouldn't be applied
verbatim without first establishing a baseline performance that any
subsequent tweaks can be measured against to determine the effect.
Most tuning involves some form of trade-off. That is, you increase
throughput or capacity of one subsystem at the cost of another.
Having said that, I usually always apply the database tuning
recommendations cited in the above guide.






 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Connections
database scripts




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">On the subject of
databases, IBM Connections ships with scripts used by the Create
Database wizard to create all the necessary databases but with
one-size-fits-all settings. These will work fine and get you
started. However, it is likely that your backup and recovery
strategy will be to perform online backups overnight without having
to take the system down. To facilitate this, ask your DB2 database
administrators to review the scripts prior to running them to
ensure that Archive Transaction logging is enabled (this is a
requirement of online backups in DB2). Also, maintenance tasks
(such as performing a backup or a reorganization) and the requisite
maintenance window will need to be defined at the database
level.




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Where a database
administrator isn't available, or the scripts are run unmodified, I
have written DB2 scripts to make the necessary modifications,
although this does require the Connections environment to be down
while the one-time maintenance is performed.




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Your
thoughts




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">I hope you find
the experience documented in this two-part blog post useful. There
will undoubtedly be more lessons learned along the way, and I look
forward to hearing from you if you have any other tips you would
like to share. Please leave your comments below or find me on
Twitter href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 






style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul
Band
is a technical consultant for IBM Software Services
for Collaboration in the UK. Paul specializes in the implementation
and administration of collaboration systems. Paul is especially
passionate about using social networking to find expertise and
widen his network. Paul co-authored a Redbooks wiki publication on
Domino administration best practices and enjoys cycling and crazy
golf.






 




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul is an IBM
Redbooks thought leader




style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">

 

 

 

 

 


3 Wannes Rams commented Permalink


 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><font
style="font-size: 13pt">Social software lessons from the field:
Part 2

 

Paul Band, IBM Software Services for
Collaboration
 

<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><a
href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In <a
href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/entry/social_software_lessons_from_the_field_part_1?lang=en_us"
target="_blank">part 1 of this two-part series, we
discussed some of the <a
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/conn/">IBM
Connections architectural options and how to get the most from
profiles. Now we'll focus on some more tips that will help your IBM
Connections deployment stand out from the crowd.
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Community
metrics

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span
style="font-weight: normal;">Measuring engagement and contribution
will be an important part of your business adoption strategy.
Community owners therefore need the ability to monitor the adoption
of their communities. The
Community Metrics component of IBM
Connections allows community owners to see what’s the most valuable
content, the most likable content and the most active content of
the community, as well as the number of visits.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In order to expose
and perform analysis on community metrics you must deploy the
(optional) <a
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">IBM
Cog<a
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">nos
Business Intelligence server component as part of the
Connections infrastructure. Although this can be deployed at any
time, building it into the overall deployment plan will make the
roll out of Connections simpler and faster.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The Connections
UI: Organizational branding

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Many customers
want to customize the Connections site to align with their
corporate branding or intranet theme. Thankfully the Connections
developers have made implementing changes to the user interface
(UI) fairly straightforward. You will need some experience with web
design (including CSS and JSP) and graphical design skills for
manipulating images, such as logos.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">From my experience
you should engage your organization's graphics team to produce
logos and other images, because they either have a library of
images already or can create them very quickly. They can also
advise on color scheme standards and provide color HEX values
necessary for customizing the color scheme.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Common UI changes
include:

 
 

  •  

  •  
     

     
    <span
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Rebranding from
    IBM Connections to MyOrg Connect <span
    style="font-style: normal;">(or similar)

     
     

  •  

  •  
     

     
    <span
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Updating the
    site's color scheme

     
     

  •  

  •  
     

     
    <span
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding your
    corporate logos

     
     

  •  

  •  
     

     
    <span
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding a custom
    disclaimer or usage policy on the login screen

     
     

  •  

  •  
     

     
    <span
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Modifying existing
    URL links in the footer

     
     

  •  

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The daily, weekly
and update notifications are often overlooked and can also be
customized to incorporate the same branding and UI scheme as in the
main Connections site. One tip would be to test notifications in
all the different email client types you have, as some things can
render differently, depending on the
implementation.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Performance
tuning

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span
style="font-weight: normal;">If you followed the architectural
advice thus far, the Connections system will be receptive to tuning
to your specific usage and environment.
Tuning and the
resulting system capacity is affected by many factors including the
type of usage and the hardware used (including servers, disk
subsystems and network topology). You should aim to tune the system
once it is fully in production and a typical type of usage is
established.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">There is a very
good guide to IBM Connections performance tuning produced by the
IBM Collaboration Solutions Performance Team that is available <a
href="http://www-10.lotus.com/ldd/lcwiki.nsf/dx/IBM_Connections_4.0_Performance_Tuning_Guide">here.
Although the guide was produced for version 4.0, many of the
principles and techniques can be applied to future versions. It
covers a number of deployment scenarios, so it should yield some
useful insights regardless of your situation.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">It's also worth
pointing out that any performance tuning guide shouldn't be applied
verbatim without first establishing a baseline performance that any
subsequent tweaks can be measured against to determine the effect.
Most tuning involves some form of trade-off. That is, you increase
throughput or capacity of one subsystem at the cost of another.
Having said that, I usually always apply the database tuning
recommendations cited in the above guide.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Connections
database scripts

 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">On the subject of
databases, IBM Connections ships with scripts used by the Create
Database wizard to create all the necessary databases but with
one-size-fits-all settings. These will work fine and get you
started. However, it is likely that your backup and recovery
strategy will be to perform online backups overnight without having
to take the system down. To facilitate this, ask your DB2 database
administrators to review the scripts prior to running them to
ensure that Archive Transaction logging is enabled (this is a
requirement of online backups in DB2). Also, maintenance tasks
(such as performing a backup or a reorganization) and the requisite
maintenance window will need to be defined at the database
level.
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Where a database
administrator isn't available, or the scripts are run unmodified, I
have written DB2 scripts to make the necessary modifications,
although this does require the Connections environment to be down
while the one-time maintenance is performed.
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Your
thoughts

 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">I hope you find
the experience documented in this two-part blog post useful. There
will undoubtedly be more lessons learned along the way, and I look
forward to hearing from you if you have any other tips you would
like to share. Please leave your comments below or find me on
Twitter <a
href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul
Band
is a technical consultant for IBM Software Services
for Collaboration in the UK. Paul specializes in the implementation
and administration of collaboration systems. Paul is especially
passionate about using social networking to find expertise and
widen his network. Paul co-authored a Redbooks wiki publication on
Domino administration best practices and enjoys cycling and crazy
golf.

 
 

 
 

 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
<span
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul is an IBM
Redbooks thought leader
 
 
 
 
<p align="left" dir="ltr"
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 

 

 

 
 
 

4 Gourishankar Menon commented Permalink

 
 
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><font
 
style="font-size: 13pt">Social software lessons from the
field:
 
Part 2
 
 
 
 
 
Paul Band, IBM Software Services for
 
Collaboration

 
 
 
<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><a
 
href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In <a
 
href="https://www-304.ibm.com/connections/blogs/socialbusiness/entry/social_software_lessons_from_the_field_part_1?lang=en_us"
 
target="_blank">part 1 of this two-part series, we
 
discussed some of the <a
 
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/conn/">IBM
 
Connections architectural options and how to get the most
from
 
profiles. Now we'll focus on some more tips that will help your
IBM
 
Connections deployment stand out from the crowd.
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Community
 
metrics
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span
 
style="font-weight: normal;">Measuring engagement and
contribution
 
will be an important part of your business adoption strategy.
 
Community owners therefore need the ability to monitor the
adoption
 
of their communities. The
Community Metrics component of
IBM
 
Connections allows community owners to see what’s the most
valuable
 
content, the most likable content and the most active content
of
 
the community, as well as the number of visits.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In order to
expose
 
and perform analysis on community metrics you must deploy the
 
(optional) <a
 
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">IBM
 
Cog<a
 
href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/us/en/business-intelligence/">nos
 
Business Intelligence server component as part of the
 
Connections infrastructure. Although this can be deployed at
any
 
time, building it into the overall deployment plan will make
the
 
roll out of Connections simpler and faster.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The
Connections
 
UI: Organizational branding
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Many
customers
 
want to customize the Connections site to align with their
 
corporate branding or intranet theme. Thankfully the
Connections
 
developers have made implementing changes to the user
interface
 
(UI) fairly straightforward. You will need some experience with
web
 
design (including CSS and JSP) and graphical design skills
for
 
manipulating images, such as logos.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">From my
experience
 
you should engage your organization's graphics team to
produce
 
logos and other images, because they either have a library of
 
images already or can create them very quickly. They can also
 
advise on color scheme standards and provide color HEX values
 
necessary for customizing the color scheme.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Common UI
changes
 
include:
 
 
 

 


  •  

  •  


  •  

  •  

     

     

    <span
     
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Rebranding
    from
     
    IBM Connections to MyOrg Connect <span
     
    style="font-style: normal;">(or similar)
     
     
     

     


  •  

  •  


  •  

  •  

     

     

    <span
     
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Updating
    the
     
    site's color scheme
     
     
     

     


  •  

  •  


  •  

  •  

     

     

    <span
     
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding
    your
     
    corporate logos
     
     
     

     


  •  

  •  


  •  

  •  

     

     

    <span
     
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Adding a
    custom
     
    disclaimer or usage policy on the login screen
     
     
     

     


  •  

  •  


  •  

  •  

     

     

    <span
     
    style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Modifying
    existing
     
    URL links in the footer
     
     
     

     


  •  

  •  


  •  


 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The daily,
weekly
 
and update notifications are often overlooked and can also be
 
customized to incorporate the same branding and UI scheme as in
the
 
main Connections site. One tip would be to test notifications
in
 
all the different email client types you have, as some things
can
 
render differently, depending on the
 
implementation.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Performance
 
tuning
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span
 
style="font-weight: normal;">If you followed the
architectural
 
advice thus far, the Connections system will be receptive to
tuning
 
to your specific usage and environment.
Tuning and the
 
resulting system capacity is affected by many factors including
the
 
type of usage and the hardware used (including servers, disk
 
subsystems and network topology). You should aim to tune the
system
 
once it is fully in production and a typical type of usage is
 
established.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">There is a
very
 
good guide to IBM Connections performance tuning produced by
the
 
IBM Collaboration Solutions Performance Team that is available
<a
 
href="http://www-10.lotus.com/ldd/lcwiki.nsf/dx/IBM_Connections_4.0_Performance_Tuning_Guide">here.
 
Although the guide was produced for version 4.0, many of the
 
principles and techniques can be applied to future versions.
It
 
covers a number of deployment scenarios, so it should yield
some
 
useful insights regardless of your situation.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">It's also
worth
 
pointing out that any performance tuning guide shouldn't be
applied
 
verbatim without first establishing a baseline performance that
any
 
subsequent tweaks can be measured against to determine the
effect.
 
Most tuning involves some form of trade-off. That is, you
increase
 
throughput or capacity of one subsystem at the cost of
another.
 
Having said that, I usually always apply the database tuning
 
recommendations cited in the above guide.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Connections
 
database scripts
 
 
 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">On the subject
of
 
databases, IBM Connections ships with scripts used by the
Create
 
Database wizard to create all the necessary databases but
with
 
one-size-fits-all settings. These will work fine and get you
 
started. However, it is likely that your backup and recovery
 
strategy will be to perform online backups overnight without
having
 
to take the system down. To facilitate this, ask your DB2
database
 
administrators to review the scripts prior to running them to
 
ensure that Archive Transaction logging is enabled (this is a
 
requirement of online backups in DB2). Also, maintenance
tasks
 
(such as performing a backup or a reorganization) and the
requisite
 
maintenance window will need to be defined at the database
 
level.
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Where a
database
 
administrator isn't available, or the scripts are run unmodified,
I
 
have written DB2 scripts to make the necessary modifications,
 
although this does require the Connections environment to be
down
 
while the one-time maintenance is performed.
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 
 

 

 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Your
 
thoughts
 
 
 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">I hope you
find
 
the experience documented in this two-part blog post useful.
There
 
will undoubtedly be more lessons learned along the way, and I
look
 
forward to hearing from you if you have any other tips you
would
 
like to share. Please leave your comments below or find me on
 
Twitter <a
 
href="https://twitter.com/therealpaulband">@therealpaulband.
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

 
 

 

 

 

 

<span
 
style="font-family:
arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul
 
Band
is a technical consultant for IBM Software
Services
 
for Collaboration in the UK. Paul specializes in the
implementation
 
and administration of collaboration systems. Paul is
especially
 
passionate about using social networking to find expertise
and
 
widen his network. Paul co-authored a Redbooks wiki publication
on
 
Domino administration best practices and enjoys cycling and
crazy
 
golf.
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 

<span
 
style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Paul is an
IBM
 
Redbooks thought leader
 

 

 

 

<p align="left" dir="ltr"
 
style="margin-bottom: 0in; font-weight: normal">
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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